A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle

A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle

Hugh MacDiarmid / Oct 21, 2019

A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle Kenneth Buthlay s edition of A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle is widely considered to be the best edition of all and provides extensive commentary and notes taking the reader through MacDiarmid s com

  • Title: A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle
  • Author: Hugh MacDiarmid
  • ISBN: 9780870230745
  • Page: 139
  • Format: Paperback
  • Kenneth Buthlay s edition of A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle is widely considered to be the best edition of all and provides extensive commentary and notes, taking the reader through MacDiarmid s complex and often opaque use of language The drunk man lies on a moonlit hillside looking at a thistle, jaggy and beautiful, which epitomises Scotland s divided self The man reKenneth Buthlay s edition of A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle is widely considered to be the best edition of all and provides extensive commentary and notes, taking the reader through MacDiarmid s complex and often opaque use of language The drunk man lies on a moonlit hillside looking at a thistle, jaggy and beautiful, which epitomises Scotland s divided self The man reflects on the fate of the nation, the human condition in general and his own personal fears.

    • A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle By Hugh MacDiarmid
      139 Hugh MacDiarmid
    • thumbnail Title: A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle By Hugh MacDiarmid
      Posted by:Hugh MacDiarmid
      Published :2019-07-22T21:20:04+00:00

    About "Hugh MacDiarmid"

      • Hugh MacDiarmid

        Christopher Murray Grieve, known by his pen name, Hugh MacDiarmid, was a Scottish poet and cultural activist.He was instrumental in creating a Scottish version of modernism and was a leading light in the Scottish Renaissance of the 20th century Unusually for a first generation modernist, he was a communist unusually for a communist, he was a committed Scottish nationalist He wrote in English and literary Scots sometimes referred to as Lallans.


    354 Comments

    1. A DRUNK MAN LOOKS AT THE THISTLE, first published in 1926, is considered by many to be the greatest work of 20th century Scottish literature. The poem, which is both fascinating and intriguing, expresses Hugh MacDiarmid’s views on just about everything, including the future of Scotland and of mankind.MacDiarmid was a leading figure in the Scottish renaissance, and A DRUNK MAN, along with a host of MacDiarmid’s other writings, was highly influential in changing the course of modern Scottish l [...]


    2. A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle is a 2685-line poem written under a pseudonym by a literary figure who had just changed his mind about everything he thought about his own culture and wanted to avoid embarrassment. The poem contains references to classical myth, Burns (many), Shakespeare, T.S. Eliot, Gerard Manly Hopkins, Milton, and wonderful interactions with and retoolings of Dostoevsky's thoughts. It is written in Scots, which makes it quite fun (and almost compulsory) to read out loud, and [...]


    3. As you've probably already guessed, this book isn't the easiest in the world to read. It's in fact a long poem written in vernacular Scottish - imagine coming across a drunk Scottish farmer in a rural area and you've just about got the gist of it. Oh, and get that farmer to translate the odd Russian poem into Scots dialect here and there. The entire text is purposefully de-anglocentric, as MacDiarmid was calling for a Scottish Renaissance in terms of literature. To move away from the static reso [...]


    4. Full review to come.Dense epic Scots poem. Highly recommended if you enjoy existential crises like I do.


    5. Not an easy read but actually a lot easier than I first thought it would be. The notes and glossary of words are well done and in such a way it is quick to spot translations words for any of Scots words which you get stuck on. Admittedly I read each page or so about three times to get a good understanding of translation and also the references peppered thoughout the poem.The poem and points are well written and very appropiate given the up coming vote for Scotland. All in all an interesting work [...]


    6. MacDiarmid's poetry is revolutionary because it could never be read or considered English. He writes to resist assimilation but he also doesn't attempt to recreate a historical moment that he doesn't have access to. It's the most scots and the least Burns at the same time a poet can get --I think.


    7. Accessible and important in places, contradictory and confused in others, much like MacDiarmid himself, I suppose.



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