The Monitors

The Monitors

Keith Laumer / Oct 21, 2019

The Monitors A Voice From the SkyEven after the set had been turned off the T V blared the announcement Citizens of Earth I am Tersh Jetterax It is my pleasure to announce to you that a new government has now ta

  • Title: The Monitors
  • Author: Keith Laumer
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 399
  • Format: Paperback
  • A Voice From the SkyEven after the set had been turned off, the T.V blared the announcement Citizens of Earth, I am Tersh Jetterax It is my pleasure to announce to you that a new government has now taken over the conduct of all public affairs And thus the U.S was in the hands of the Monitors, the strangely polite yellow clad bings whose powers were such that they couA Voice From the SkyEven after the set had been turned off, the T.V blared the announcement Citizens of Earth, I am Tersh Jetterax It is my pleasure to announce to you that a new government has now taken over the conduct of all public affairs And thus the U.S was in the hands of the Monitors, the strangely polite yellow clad bings whose powers were such that they could render everyone helpless without shedding one drop of blood Who were they The Russians An alien race from another planet

    • The Monitors >> Keith Laumer
      399 Keith Laumer
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      Posted by:Keith Laumer
      Published :2019-07-21T19:49:50+00:00

    About "Keith Laumer"

      • Keith Laumer

        John Keith Laumer 9 June 1925 23 January 1993 was an American science fiction author Prior to becoming a full time writer, he was an officer in the U.S Air Force and a U.S diplomat His brother March Laumer was also a writer, known for his adult reinterpretations of the Land of Oz also mentioned in Keith s The Other Side of Time.Keith Laumer aka J.K Laumer, J Keith Laumer is best known for his Bolo stories and his satirical Retief series The former chronicles the evolution of juggernaut sized tanks that eventually become self aware through the constant improvement resulting from centuries of intermittent warfare against various alien races The latter deals with the adventures of a cynical spacefaring diplomat who constantly has to overcome the red tape infused failures of people with names like Ambassador Grossblunder The Retief stories were greatly influenced by Laumer s earlier career in the United States Foreign Service In an interview with Paul Walker of Luna Monthly, Laumer states I had no shortage of iniquitous memories of the Foreign Service Four of his shorter works received Hugo or Nebula Award nominations one of them, In the Queue , received nominations for both and his novel A Plague of Demons was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1966.During the peak years of 1959 1971, Laumer was a prolific science fiction writer, with his novels tending to follow one of two patterns fast paced, straight adventures in time and space, with an emphasis on lone wolf, latent superman protagonists, self sacrifice and transcendence or, broad comedies, sometimes of the over the top variety.In 1971, Laumer suffered a stroke while working on the novel The Ultimax Man As a result, he was unable to write for a few years As he explained in an interview with Charles Platt published in The Dream Makers 1987 , he refused to accept the doctors diagnosis He came up with an alternative explanation and developed an alternative and very painful treatment program Although he was unable to write in the early 1970s, he had a number of books which were in the pipeline at the time of the stroke published during that time.In the mid 1970s, Laumer partially recovered from the stroke and resumed writing However, the quality of his work suffered and his career declined Piers Anthony, How Precious Was That While, 2002 In later years Laumer also reused scenarios and characters from his earlier works to create new books, which some critics felt was to their detriment Alas, Retief to the Rescue doesn t seem so much like a new Retief novel, but a kind of Cuisnart m lange of past books Somtow Sucharitkul Washington Post, Mar 27, 1983 p BW11 His Bolo creations were popular enough that other authors have written standalone science fiction novels about them.Laumer was also a model airplane enthusiast, and published two dozen designs between 1956 and 1962 in the U.S magazines Air Trails, Model Airplane News and Flying Models, as well as the British Aero Modeler He published one book on the subject, How to Design and Build Flying Models in 1960 His later designs were mostly gas powered free flight planes, and had a whimsical charm with names to match, like the Twin Lizzie and the Lulla Bi His designs are still being revisited, reinvented and built today.


    881 Comments

    1. review of Keith Laumer's The Monitors by tENTATIVELY, a cONVENIENCE - June 26, 2013 How many people start off their day w/ the intention of writing 3 reviews of SF novels written in the '60s by one author? Knowing that there's no pay involved, knowing that money is going to be very scarce in their life very soon. & listening to the music of Arthur Berger & Edward Burlingame Hill on a CBS Special Service Records Collectors', Modern American Music, Series. Only a fool, someone might say. O [...]


    2. This novel was not what I was expecting given the jacket summary or the cover. It's pure, hilarious, laugh-out-loud satire--reminiscent of his Retief stories, but in my opinion more funny throughout. (The Retief stories were often funny satire at the beginning, then turned into so-so action-adventures, then back into great satire.) Also unlike the Retief stories, The Monitors is about the United States--slightly dated, now, since it was written in 1966, but most of the stuff he's making fun of i [...]


    3. When I was a teenager, years before cable TV, the local TV channels would play old movies all day during the weekend. Those "Flint' movies with James Coburn would show up now and then, old Hammer horror films, Doris Day - Rock Hudson movies, Jerry Lewis movies, Elvis movies, Godzilla, Westerns. All sorts of B movies. Every now and then they would play 'The Monitors', based on this book. I remember it as a very odd movie, though often very funny. I don't think I was old enough to really understan [...]


    4. I remember thinking Laumer's novels were pretty funny back when I was in high school, but even then I was aware that the Cold War politics that formed the basis for most of his satire might date them a bit upon revisiting. Well, the bad news is that, yeah, they do come off as rather dated, but on the other hand that gives them a sort of period charm that's hard to resist. This novel in particular (adapted into a cult film by a bunch of Second City vets in the 70s) fares better than most, and eve [...]


    5. Another of Laumer's "everyone is dumber than a rock" books. It's his usual style, so if you're a Laumer fan, you won't be disappointed. The end is a surprise which was satisfying for me.Worth a read if you can get hold of a copy.


    6. The Monitors is a novel typical of Laumer in the '60s; humorous and opinionated observations of society and politics. It's a very non-serious tale of alien invasion. It hasn't aged as well as much of his other work, and many people would now find some of his race and gender beliefs offensive.


    7. This was fairly typical for Laumer, but a little different. He wrote what you'd expect from 1960s action sci-fi -- lots of fight and chase scenes, stereotyping that is still occasionally funny, and an ever moving plot. Laumer wasn't big on character development, instead focusing on commentary on governments and the general population.What was different this time around was the overlap in style with his Retief stories -- the "friends" of the good guys are as bad as the baddies. Aliens have invade [...]


    8. Strange. It held my interest, though was very (very) shallow. Follows around a guy who is (sort of) spying on super-humans (sort of on the human part) who just want everyone to get along. Has a few laughs. Dated writing style. Quick read.


    9. In spite of the excellently surreal cover, the book itself was a largely dated and unfunny alien invasion comedy and a slow read. If you like Laumer's Bolo stories, this isn't like those at all.



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